Wireless Technology

Self management of chronic disease in older people using wireless technologies

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This network is about investigating whether wireless information and communications technologies can facilitate such new ways of working. In particular, we have focused on the use of mobile Smartphones, recognising the mobile as 'the acceptable face of technology' to many lay people.

Investigator(s)

Alison Marshall, University of Leeds

Contact details

Alison Marshall

Background

Chronic disease is a major, and growing, issue for older people. Current health and social care provision has largely developed in response to demands for acute care. Not only does this provision not meet the needs of modern society, but there is also insufficient resource available to continue in this way. Government policy is to enable people to self manage their illness and lifestyle, for which new ways of working need to evolve.

Aims/objectives

The issues to be investigated in the project include usability issues; data management, integration and control; trust, privacy and security issues; clinical feasibility, economic viability.

Work has focused initially on developing two prototype systems, which can be demonstrated to non-technical partners (both academic and non-academic) leading to more focused (clinical) user evaluation, feedback, further development and full trial. The plan is to use the main phase of the programme to focus on one of these prototypes in a much larger scale trial. The partners will evaluate the prototype within a number of different contexts.

Result

Unfortunately, this project was not funded by the NDA.

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